Intestinal Nutrient Sensing

Intestinal Nutrient Sensing
Intestinal Nutrient Sensing

The Intestinal Nutrient Sensing Group investigates how sugars, low-calorie sweeteners and bitter components in our food are detected by the ‘taste system’ of the digestive tract. This ‘taste system’ controls how glucose is absorbed and managed in the body.

The Intestinal Nutrient Sensing Group has discovered how this works in healthy people and what happens when it is disrupted in type 2 diabetes, critical illness or obesity.

The group is discovering the precise ways these ‘taste’ signals are initiated within the gut, and by gut bacteria, to communicate to the whole body. This is important knowledge with the potential to lead to new ways to prevent and better manage metabolic diseases.

Within this arena, this group offers Higher Degree Research projects that span interventional clinical research through to preclinical research with disease and genetic models. These projects, and single year Honours projects, are tailored to the individual candidate and can commence at the beginning of each year or at mid-year. These are based within the Adelaide BioMed City precinct at SAHMRI, with clinical research conducted at the nearby Royal Adelaide Hospital.

Volunteers are also invited to participate in this group’s research, joining projects that aim to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, as well as to provide new medications to better manage the disease. Volunteers aged between 28 and 75 years who are non-diabetic or have their diabetes managed by diet or metformin alone are most welcome. Volunteers are remunerated for their time spent in the group’s research programs.

Intestinal Nutrient 2