The Obesity and Metabolism Group is internationally recognised for its work in caloric restriction, metabolism and healthy aging in humans.

Major recent contributions have been in the discovering that modulating when we eat is important in maintaining glycaemic control. Over the next five years the group will capitalise on these initial findings with complete long-term clinical trials that will determine optimal, sustainable eating patterns that will delay the development of Type 2 diabetes. Since our discoveries are made primarily in humans, results can be readily translated to improve the health of all Australians.

Leonie and team

Major recent contributions have been in the discovering that modulating when we eat is important in maintaining glycaemic control. Over the next five years the group will capitalise on these initial findings with complete long-term clinical trials that will determine optimal, sustainable eating patterns that will delay the development of Type 2 diabetes. Since our discoveries are made primarily in humans, results can be readily translated to improve the health of all Australians.

Obesity and overweight are strong contributing factors to the high prevalence of chronic diseases. Lifestyle management, which incorporates advice on calorie restriction (CR) and increased physical activity to reduce body weight, remains the cornerstone therapy and reduces disease risk. However, difficulties in sustaining weight loss are well documented and long-term compliance to CR remains poor.

The Obesity and Metabolism Group is currently examining how lengthening the daily fast in line with the biological clock in a process known as time-restricted eating (TRE) impacts on markers of health and longevity in humans. The team hopes to identify the ideal starting time and duration of the fast to optimise healthy ageing and reduce the burden of chronic disease in people with and without obesity. The group wishes to identify the cellular pathways and potential mechanisms through which this occurs and also to identify the enablers and barriers to adherence to ascertain the role of diet quality versus meal timing in health and disease.